Stuff I Love Review: Yaktrax Pro

YakTrax have pretty much replaced my snowshoes for winter running in Summit County, Colorado.

YakTrax have pretty much replaced my snowshoes for winter running in Summit County, Colorado.

As spring nears and Summit County, Colorado gets hit with 50-degree days, those 300+ inches of snow we’ve seen so far this season begin to melt. With the piles of snow that line the sidewalks and, in places, tower above our heads, that melt doesn’t always have a clear path to nearby creeks. So at night, it refreezes and creates a bit of a skating rink outside our front door.

Between twice-daily dog walks and late evening runs, I find myself skating along the sidewalks pretty often. Thanks to my Yaktrax, I skate no more.

Since we knew we’d be using them for hiking and running as well as daily walking, we went with the Yaktrax Pro. They’re one step above the Yaktrax Walker, which is perfect for the to-and-from work routine. The Pro is billed as a work/run model and I’ve pretty much replaced my snowshoes with the Yaktrax Pro.

On fall and spring hikes, when it's common to encounter snow and ice up high, Yaktrax often come in handy. And, they're much lighter and easier to pack than snowshoes.

On fall and spring hikes, when it's common to encounter snow and ice up high, Yaktrax often come in handy. And, they're much lighter and easier to pack than snowshoes.

Many of the easily accessed town trails here in Summit County, Colorado get packed down with the foot traffic of abundant outdoor enthusiasts. And when I don’t have the worry of postholing, I don’t bother with my snowshoes. I just pull on the Yaktrax and run or walk my way along the trail.

The other nice thing about YakTrax is that they pack very easily. I always bring them on early and late-season summer hikes and they’ve made my life easier on many of those occasions, including an overnight hike on Ute Pass.

The most recent model (I think) – the XTR (extreme traction) – I discovered on the Yaktrax website. I’ve only seen photos but it’s built with plates to prevent snowpack. Heavier-duty design, along with spikes, seems to be what makes it beefier than the original.

The lack of spikes is one of the many reasons I love the regular Yaktrax – it’s not the end of the world if I hit a little rock and mud, or even dry pavement, which we’ll be experiencing when spring really rolls in.

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