Crohn’s Recipe: Salmon & Goat Cheese Omlettes

Salmon & goat cheese omelettes: We have no pictures of completed omelettes, as we typically devour them as soon as they're done. They're great served with toast, and I like half an orange or a small glass of juice on the side.

Salmon & goat cheese omelettes: We have no pictures of completed omelettes, as we typically devour them as soon as they’re ready. They’re great with toast, and I like half an orange or a small glass of juice on the side.

Crohn’s Recipe: Salmon & Goat Cheese Omelettes

Makes one omelette

  • 1 or 2 eggs (I suppose you could use three, but that would be too much unless we’re splitting it)
  • garlic powder
  • salt
  • cooked salmon (I usually use leftovers, which we cook simply with salt on the grill)
  • goat cheese*
  • green onions and pepper (optional)**

Whisk together eggs, salt, garlic powder and a splash of cold water. Heat a nonstick pan on medium/low heat and spray with cooking spray. When hot, add egg mixture and let cook. When the edges are set just enough to lift up with a good spatula (most of the egg mixture will still be liquid), lift up the omelette and tilt the pan so that the mixture runs under what’s already cooked. This prevents overcooking and still lets you flip the omelette without using butter.***

Once the top is mostly set (little to no liquid should move when you tilt the pan), flip. Add salmon and dabs of goat cheese (plus green onions and pepper if using) to half and fold over. Let cook just a little longer to warm the filling and melt the cheese. Serve immediately.

A super-simple recipe, salmon and goat cheese omelettes are great for using that last little bit of leftover grilled salmon.

A super-simple recipe, salmon and goat cheese omelettes are great for using that last little bit of leftover grilled salmon.

*Goat cheese is not lactose free. But after meeting several lactose-free folks who could eat goat cheese, we gave it a try. It worked! I’ve read that cheeses made with goat’s milk are easier to digest, but even if it doesn’t work for you, I think rice Parmesan (or any non-dairy Parmesan-style cheese, but the rice kind is my favorite) might be a good alternative. It’s not creamy but the strong flavor should work well in this recipe.

**Crohn’s Tip: As someone who can eat anything, I enjoy certain flavors and foods that my husband cannot eat at all. A major part of learning to cook food we can both enjoy is figuring out what can be served on the side, or creating sauces and sides that suit my preferences. For the salmon and goat cheese omelettes, I typically make two omelettes (I use just one egg for mine, two for his), and add green onions and black pepper. If we want to eat together I’ll make a three-egg omelette and top my third with green onions and black pepper. On the electric stove, I just turn off the burner after folding over, and the omelette will stay warm until the toast is ready.

***This technique is something I learned from a book a long time ago — I originally used it as a way to eliminate extra fat. Since we’re learning that lots of butter/fat isn’t always great for Eric’s Crohn’s diet, I’d prefer to use a small amount of butter on our toast and eliminate it from the eggs.

 

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